PPMS
Home       Current RFAs       PD User Guide       Contact Us       Projects       Login      

Funded Project
Funding Program: Enhancement Grants - Special Projects
Project Title: Developing a comprehensive research and educational approach to managing defoliating pests in soybean
Project Directors (PDs):
David Holshouser [1]
Ames Herbert [2]
Lead State: VA

Lead Organization: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Undesignated Funding: $12,463
Start Date: Aug-01-2006

End Date: Jul-31-2007
Summary: The southern region of the U.S. produced more than 360 million bushels of soybean on over 11 million acres in 2005. The crop continues to contribute to the regions economic well-being, adding approximately $2 billion to its economy. However defoliating pests are threatening the viability of the crop. Phytophagous insects and wildlife continue to limit profits realized by soybean producers through removal of photosynthetic leaf area. New threats such as Asian soybean rust that reduce yield primarily by defoliation are adding to the problem. Unfortunately, sound IPM strategies are not in place to effectively manage these defoliating pests. Gaps exist in our knowledge and understanding of how soybean leaf area development and phenological stage interacts with yield losses from defoliation. Although recent research has concluded that an estimation of soybean leaf area must be included in our economic thresholds, there is currently no accurate and practical way of measuring soybean leaf area. Until the most cost-effective methods of estimating leaf area are identified, putting leaf area-based defoliation thresholds into practice will be a challenge. Furthermore, once research gaps are filled and a cost-effective method of estimating leaf area is determined, users must be provided with appropriate tools and training to implement the most-effective strategy. Therefore, to effectively manage defoliating pests, our knowledge and understanding must be improved. We must also develop methods to measure leaf area and educate users on these new strategies. Should this proposal be funded, we will build a team of researchers, extension personnel, soybean producers, and IPM practitioners to evaluate needs, review current knowledge, and establish priorities for future research and educational programs. In addition, we will conduct small, inexpensive experiments to provide preliminary data that will contribute to the final output of this effort, the development of a major grant proposal to other funding sources.

Objectives: The southern region of the U.S. produced more than 360 million bushels of soybean on over 11 million acres in 2005. The crop continues to contribute to the regions economic well-being, adding approximately $2 billion to its economy. However defoliating pests are threatening the viability of the crop. Phytophagous insects and wildlife continue to limit profits realized by soybean producers through removal of photosynthetic leaf area. New threats such as Asian soybean rust that reduce yield primarily by defoliation are adding to the problem. Unfortunately, sound IPM strategies are not in place to effectively manage these defoliating pests. Gaps exist in our knowledge and understanding of how soybean leaf area development and phenological stage interacts with yield losses from defoliation. Although recent research has concluded that an estimation of soybean leaf area must be included in our economic thresholds, there is currently no accurate and practical way of measuring soybean leaf area. Until the most cost-effective methods of estimating leaf area are identified, putting leaf area-based defoliation thresholds into practice will be a challenge. Furthermore, once research gaps are filled and a cost-effective method of estimating leaf area is determined, users must be provided with appropriate tools and training to implement the most-effective strategy. Therefore, to effectively manage defoliating pests, our knowledge and understanding must be improved. We must also develop methods to measure leaf area and educate users on these new strategies. Should this proposal be funded, we will build a team of researchers, extension personnel, soybean producers, and IPM practitioners to evaluate needs, review current knowledge, and establish priorities for future research and educational programs. In addition, we will conduct small, inexpensive experiments to provide preliminary data that will contribute to the final output of this effort, the development of a major grant proposal to other funding sources.


Close Window


Southern IPM Center
North Carolina State University
1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110
Raleigh, NC 27606
p. 919.513.1432   f. 919.513.1114

USDA NIFA
Developed by the Center for IPM
© Copyright CIPM 2004-2017
Center for IPM